Gintaras Palemonas Janonis

Gintaras Palemonas Janonis

"Vasaros diena", 2016, aliejus ir drobė, 90x60, 700€

Gintaras Palemonas Janonis

"Vieną dieną", 2009, aliejus ir drobė, 74x61, 800€

Gintaras Palemonas Janonis was born in Trakai in 1962. In 1972 he graduated from the LSSR State Art Institute with a degree in restoration. Janonis is one of the most famous middle generation Lithuanian painters. Since 1986, when the young artist‘s works appeared for the first time in public, G.P. Janonis has had more than 30 individual exhibitions of his art, has participated in at least 200 different exhibitions in Lithuania and abroad, and his paintings have been acquired by museums and private collections in Lithuania, USA, Germany, Denmark, Netherlands, Israel, Poland, France, England, and Norway. He is also an Associate Professor at Vilnius Academy of Fine Arts, and has extensive experience in the field of restoration of historical frescos. He trained in Italy (Florence), and is a highly qualified restorer of paintings. This discipline requires both professionalism and versatile knowledge of the craft. Art critic Rita Mikučionytė described the peculiarity of his art in one sentence as follows: "A clear structural composition, a free expressive painting style, richly colored palette and accentuated details create a mysterious aura in Janonis‘ compositions, regardless of how they would be named or from which narrative they arise."

When art critics try to characterize Janonis‘ creative work, they do not talk about its breakthroughs, the stages of change, any blue or pink, colorful or constructivist periods and such. The development of his work is consistent, without sways, but researchers distinguish the particularities of works created in different periods of his life and associate them with certain themes, ideas, stories, motives, and images. The author himself wrote: "Life and painting cycles do not match. Often, painting cycles last for decades, and these are not cycles, but a return to old themes. The names of these pictorial cycles only tend to mark a place or a situation."